DENGUE VIREMIA AND DENGUE SEROPREVALENCE IN BLOOD DONORS, BANGKOK, THAILAND

Authors

  • Parichart permpikul Department of Transfusion Medicine faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital Mahidol University
  • Aumnad Khongsup Department of Transfusion Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700, Thailand
  • Panisadee Avirutnan Division of Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Research, Office for Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700, Thailand
  • Adisak Songjaeng
  • Nattaya Tangthawornchaikul Molecular Biology of Dengue and Flaviviruses Research Team, Medical Molecular Biotechnology Research Group, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (BIOTEC), National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA), Bangkok 10700, Thailand
  • Tanapan Prommool Molecular Biology of Dengue and Flaviviruses Research Team, Medical Molecular Biotechnology Research Group, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (BIOTEC), National Science and Technology Development Agency (NSTDA), Bangkok 10700, Thailand
  • Nuntaya Punyadee Division of Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Research, Office for Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700, Thailand
  • Dumrong Mairiang 2Division of Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Research, Office for Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700, Thailand
  • Chunya Puttikhunt Siriraj Center of Research Excellence in Dengue and Emerging Pathogens, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700, Thailand

Keywords:

blood donor, dengue, seroprevalence, Thailand, viremia

Abstract

Dengue virus (DENV) infection is a major public health problem worldwide. Dengue clinical manifestations may range from asymptomatic, to mild symptomatic, and to a life-threatening shock syndrome. In endemic countries including Thailand blood donations from asymptomatic dengueinfected persons pose a risk for DENV transmission. We investigated the prevalence of dengue viremia and dengue immunity among Thai blood donors (n = 400) from August 2015 to March 2016 using nested RT-PCR and anti-DENV IgM/IgG capture ELISA. Only one donor was positive for dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV2) viremia as revealed by RT-quantitative PCR and virus isolation. After a two-month follow up, the donor did not develop symptoms related to DENV infection and anti-DENV IgG and IgM levels remained just above and below cut-off values, respectively and were unchanged from the day of blood donation. In dengue serological studies, anti-DENV antibody ELISA was positive for IgG in 246 (61%) and both IgG and IgM in 24 (6%) of blood donors, respectively. In conclusion, the prevalence of detectable dengue (DENV2) viremia in blood donors in Bangkok was 0.25% but there still exists concern in dengue endemic regions of a finite risk of infection from blood transfusions. Further studies with a larger sample size will be required to evaluate the cost-benefit of an additional measure to detect dengue viremia in blood donations in Thailand.

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Published

2021-06-01 — Updated on 2021-06-01

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